IN THIS ISSUE

Ellen Adams | Ana Cristina Alvarez | Annah Browning

Vajra Chandrasekera | Felicia Rose Chavez | Chekwube O. Danladi

Janelle Garcia | Molly Gutman | Aristilde Kirby | Paige Lewis

Sabrina Orah Mark | Jac Nelson | Olivia Olsen | Angela Pelster

Farah Al Qasimi | Miguel Angel Ramirez | Leslie Sainz | Krystal Sanders

sam sax | Jill Schepmann | Alex Terrell | Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

Rebecca Valley | Debbie Vance | L. Vella | C Pam Zhang

RECENT POSTS

44.1 Feature: Craft Essay by Angela Pelster

I needed to turn the words of the oppressors against them, to somehow find within the original language an act of resistance, a betrayal of the idea of superiority, and to pull out the seed of justice buried so deeply within the injustice.

44.1 Feature: CHOOSE YOUR OWN by Debbie Vance

You are sitting in your daughters’ bedroom, holding a fistful of hot pink feathers that you’ve just torn methodically from the boa that now lies naked like a snake skin on the floor.

44.1 Feature: An Interview with Leslie Sainz

“Integer,” is ultimately a narrative concerned with the difficulties of familial, and institutional forgiveness.

44.1 Feature: Craft Essay by L. Vella

This series of poems began with the idea of a twin Earth lost on the other side of the sun, eclipsed, antipodal.

2017 Pushcart Nominations!

BWR is very pleased to announce our 2017...

44.1 Feature: Craft Essay by Jill Schepmann

When I think about how to write about bodies, it seems negligent to only speak of one or to do so speaking alone. I felt that desire to see and reach others when I wrote “What Grows Inside,” and tried to make space for those other voices and experiences.

44.1 Feature: An Interview with Molly Gutman

In this story, the protagonist is a literal siren with all the magical drama that suggests, sure. But she’s also dealing with more identifiable issues, like how to own her bisexuality in a town that would rather ignore it.

44.1 Feature: A Craft Essay by Alex Terrell

“Black Dog” was my first attempt to provide a space for people like me—Black girls who had always wondered what lay beyond the trees.